Your RV’s Holding Tanks

RV Holding Tanks RV Holding Tanks (Black and Gray) During the first few times of dealing with your black and gray water RV holding tanks, you should expect to either get dirty or lucky. Fortunately the stuff that comes out of your RV holding tanks has a tendency to quicken your learning curve, so that […]

Dumping-RV-Waste-Tanks

RV Holding Tanks

RV Holding Tanks
(Black and Gray)

During the first few times of dealing with your black and gray water RV holding tanks, you should expect to either get dirty or lucky. Fortunately the stuff that comes out of your RV holding tanks has a tendency to quicken your learning curve, so that you develop routines that keep your hands cleaner. Once or twice is enough of that stuff on your hands. Slipping on a pair of gloves should always be step number one. Any of us who have gone through the process of learning the right combination of steps can tell you how hard it is to get the smell of some things off your hands.

Hooking Up

It’s better if you rinsed out your sewer line from the last time. If you did, the rest is pretty simple and relatively clean work.

I always start by removing the campground sewer cap and replacing it with my screw in adapter, assuming the campground sewer pipe is threaded. I then connect the sewer end of my sewer line and lastly the end that bayonets onto the RV connection. (Yours may be slightly different depending on your RV and the brand and type of sewer lines and connectors.) After RVing fulltime ,we have settled on the Camco Sanitary System.  (at left)  It has held up well for us.

If both the gray and black tanks are ready to be emptied, I usually open the gray water valve for a second or so, then close it again and check for leaks. If ok, I open the black water valve and empty the black tank. Then, when the black water tank is empty, I flush the lines by opening and draining the rest of the gray tank. I then leave the black water valve CLOSED and the gray water valve OPEN. Then I don’t do anything else until it’s time to dump the black water again. The night before we travel, I try to remember to close the gray water valve so that the gray water tank builds up a little. That way I have a little gray water to use to flush the line out the next morning after dumping the black water again.

Disconnecting

Open the black water valve and dump. When empty, close the black water valve.

Open the gray water valve and dump. When empty, close the gray water valve.

Disconnect the sewer line from the RV first. While still connected to the campground sewer pipe, rinse the sewer line with the shower head that is usually located inside the sewer compartment. Or if you prefer get one of the caps that attaches to your water hose and rinse with it.  I have one and it works great (included with kit above).  Then remove the rinsng cap and drain as well as possible before you set the RV end of the line down. I have a cap that fits the bayonet connection to the line. I cap off the RV end, then disconnect the other end from the campground sewer pipe and cap that end also before stowing the sewer line. . And lastly…..REMEMBER TO REMOVE YOUR SCREW IN ADAPTOR FROM THE CAMPGROUND SEWER PIPE AND STOW. (I left two behind before I had this implanted in my head….yes really!) Replace the campground sewer cap.

Since the black and gray water tanks have a somewhat “stinky” nature you will want to stay on their good side. If you understand your RV holding tanks and treat them in a friendly manner they will be friendly to you as well.

I hope this helps you to make an unpleasant task at least tolerable.

You may also like

Sign In

Reset Your Password